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US troops pelted by enraged Kurds while crossing into northern Iraq

Last updated on October 23rd, 2019

Over 100 armoured vehicles carrying the US troops, on Monday, were seen entering into the Kurdish province of northern Iraq from Syria.

The American convoy, which recently withdrew from Syria before the Turkish invasion, crossed the Tigris River en route to Erbil.

Sources told that locals of the Kurd-dominated Syrian city threw potatoes at the US troops and shouted cuss words at them while they entered the province.

On Monday, US defence chief Mark Esper announced that partial US troops will hold their positions in northeast Syria near oilfields, besides the YPG-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). The US wants to ensure the region’s oil resources remain out of the reach of the Islamic State militants.

“We presently have troops in a couple of cities located right near that area. The purpose is to deny access – specifically revenue to ISIS and any other groups that may want to seek that revenue to enable their own malign activities,” Esper said.

He further added, “There has been a discussion about possibly doing it. There has been no decision with regard to numbers or anything like that.”

Earlier this month, US President Donald Trump’s administration decided to pull back the US troops from Syria as soon as Turkey announced its plan of launching military offensive against the YPG. Trump’s call emerged as a hard betrayal to the Kurds, who helped the US to fight against the ISIS militants.

US has been following a pattern to abandon its war allies after the job is done. In the past, the US deployed its troops in Afghanistan against Taliban but later it agreed to make a negotiated peace with the group. Afghans felt betrayed after all these years of fighting and struggle. They fear the return of Taliban, which is synonymous with suppression and extremism, in their country.

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